Category: First aid blog

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What is a Stroke and who is at risk?

A stroke happens when the blood supply to the brain is disrupted, either by a blood clot blocking an artery or bleeding due to a burst blood vessel, and the brain cells are deprived...

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What are NSAIDs and how do they reduce inflammation?

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to relieve the pain, stiffness and inflammation of painful conditions affecting the muscles, bones and joints. Some first aiders may be trained to admininster NSAIDs such as Iburpofen...

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How to use a SAM sling for pelvic fractures

Fractures of the pelvis often cause life threatening internal blood loss are one of the most serious musculoskeletal injuries. The SAM Sling is a non-invasive, easy to use, single-use device, which can be applied...

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The first aid management of fractures

Fractures (broken bones) are common injuries for first aiders to have to deal with.  The correct first aid management of fractures is important as this will reduce pain and promote fracture healing.  When treating all...

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What is an Asthma Attack?

Asthma, one of the commonest medical conditions, is a disease in which the airways become blocked or narrowed. The young and the elderly are particularly vulnerable. The effects of asthma are reversible, but they...

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A guide to splinting and immobilization

Immobilizing a fracture is an important skill for first aiders and first responders. Good immobilization will reduce pain and reduce the chance of further complications.  Various types of splints and immobilisation materials are available, commonly encountered...

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When should you immobilize the c-spine?

Spinal immobilization is performed in order to reduce the chance of further damage occurring to the spinal cord. First aiders and first responders may be taught a variety of different methods to immobilize the...

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A guide to Multiple Sclerosis for first aiders

What is Multiple Sclerosis (MS)? Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the result of damage to myelin, the protective sheath surrounding the nerve fibres of the central nervous system. Myelin works like insulating cable helping to...

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How to take a manual blood pressure

Taking a manual blood pressure (using a sphygmomanometer) can be more accurate than using an electronic blood pressure machine.  The following method, should be used to measure blood pressures with manual sphygmomanometers. The cuff...

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How to perform a head to toe assessment

Performing a thorough head to toe assessment (sometimes called a ‘body check’) is an important step in the secondary survey.  Systematically searching the patient, region by region, first aiders should make a note of all...

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How to assess cardiac chest pain

Chest pain is an important symptom for first aiders and first responders to be able to assess and manage. Chest pain can have serious causes (such as a heart attack) which are important not...

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What is Cyanosis?

If you’ve recently been on a first aid course, chances are you’ve heard the term Cyanosis. But what exactly is Cyanosis and why is it important in first aid? What is Cyanosis? Cyanosis is a...