‘Witness’ a stabbing live on Facebook

Witness

‘Witness’ is a new interactive first aid film from the British Red Cross encouraging young people to learn basic first aid knowledge. In the film the viewer is a witness to a stabbing on a public bus. The film also demonstrates the bystander effect with people unwilling to help the victim.

What makes this app different from others is that it takes the technology a step further. Instead of using select personal information in static shots or animations, viewers will see those elements in live moving footage, which makes it feel as if you are really in the film. This could happen to you – you could be there. So that begs the question – what would you do?

You can check out the app on the Live. Live it. Facebook pageWhat do you think?

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6 Responses

  1. Julia says:

    Hi, I really like this post. I haven’t seen the video before, and had only seen the St John ‘Save the Boy’ campaign.

  2. Linkzelda41 says:

    Before I read this blog post, I was wondering how something like that could be broadcasted without conjuring up controversial responses for a moment. But seeing how it’s a chance for others to gain an experiential learning of what to do, it’s good to know that it’s not really a “real” case scenario of course.

    This reminds me of other shows that do empathy tests on what a person would do in a situation like that. And sometimes I think the bystander effect is so prevalent that the person that may want to help could potentially make things worse. Maybe subconsciously, we’re weighing the circumstances, and our capabilities of seeing things through and helping those in need. But before we’re able to assess the situation, most of the time it’s too late, and I think being able to think on the fly more efficiently helps in reducing that chances of not doing anything. Thanks for the post and the link to the video!

  3. sillyeggplant says:

    As a person who is really desensitized by blood and gore, I wonder how it is for a regular person to view this video. Would they freak out and close the browser, or would morbid curiosity take over? Would they try to see if they can leave the scene, or would they try to help the person? And if they helped, are they doing it just to “win” the simulation, or do they really want to learn how to help someone in a similar predicament if the occasion arises?
    It’s a really interesting phenomenon, the bystander effect. I think the reason why many people would refuse to help would be because they fear that they may make the situation worse, or that they might get sued after. I know that this thought is quite prevalent in China, and I wonder how may people in other parts of the world harbor the same thoughts as well.

  4. cpefley says:

    That sounds really intense! What a great way to make young people aware of the importance of knowing how to deal with situations like that. I think that most people think they don’t need to learn First Aid or CPR because they aren’t a medical professional, but it is something everyone should learn!

  5. snegal says:

    Wow this is interesting, not sure how I would react in a similar situation which presents itself here. Hopefully I will never have to but may give this app a look just in case the situation should arise. Thanks.

  6. theshaynee says:

    I definitely have to try this!
    I’ve always wondered what it would be like to simulate something like this for the average person. I would really be into it but I know lots of other people that wouldn’t.
    I’m really glad that people have come this far and are putting together projects like this one. This would have been extremely helpful when I was going into nursing as well. Usually, as a medical professional, you get tunnel vision. And emotions are no longer driving.

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